How to Clash Scan Data

Autodesk Navisworks was mentioned in a previous post as our primary clash detection tool. Aside from simply bringing in the point cloud and visually confirming the models match, we can also use the Clash Detective window within Navisworks to coordinate what’s been built versus what’s about to be installed with significantly more intelligence than a walk-through of the model. Continue reading…

Using Point Clouds in Clash Detection

We use Autodesk Navisworks almost exclusively as our primary clash detection tool. However, up until about a year ago, we have only worked with “projected” models – that is, shop drawings in 3D format that convey what the project will look like once that particular system is installed. Combining all of these files into Navisworks usually results in what’s known as “clashes,” or conflicts between systems where certain elements are competing for the same space. Continue reading…

Six BIM Point Cloud Formats You Should Know About

Scanning a space and bringing it into a program like Leica Cyclone will let you further manipulate the scans and, most importantly, stitch them together into a single cloud, which can then be exported as a standalone file. But what type of file do you need, and what do you do with it after it’s exported? There’s a growing list of point cloud formats being used in BIM. Here’s an overview of two primary groups of formats we’re seeing (and using) most often. Continue reading…

How to Go Mobile with Point Clouds

Importing point clouds to a laptop or desktop machine is easy. Whether you’re stitching scans together or just viewing them, there are a number of programs available to handle the data. Leica Cyclone and Autodesk ReCap are just a couple of examples. However, bringing that point cloud data with you into the field on a mobile device is not so simple. Continue reading…

The Top Five BIM File Formats & How To Use Them

Everyone has seen an email hit their inbox with attachments in file formats they’ve never heard of. While I can’t promise to explain the non-BIM formats, I would like to review a couple common formats we see pretty often in the BIM world. Here are the top five BIM file formats we see the most and what you can do with them. Continue reading…

Three Easy Ways to Check Spot Coordinates

Whether you’re using the model for layout or just checking to ensure the slab you just drew is truly at 0′-0”, spot coordinates are useful for quick location information. Specifically, sometimes you need the Y, X, and Z (or Northing, Easting, Elevation) of a specific point, and standard linear dimensions won’t cut it. Here’s how to check spot coordinates in the three programs we use the most. Continue reading…